Waarom haten ze ons? “A little list of prohibited items into Iraq” anno 1997

De Zwitserse sociologieprofessor Jean Ziegler beschrijft in zijn boek ‘De haat tegen het Westen’ hoe in grote delen van de wereld het Westen wordt gehaat en deze haat nog steeds groeiende is. Ik schreef er hier al eerder over.

De volgende lijst werd samengesteld door anti-sancties activist Elias Davidsson. Het somt de zaken op die werden verboden om te exporteren naar Irak, tijdens het ‘Oil-For-Food’ programme van de Verenigde Naties, eind jaren negentig van vorige eeuw.

Ik publiceer ze hier opdat ze niet van het internet zou verdwijnen.

A little list of prohibited items into Iraq


by Elias Davidsson
22nd December 1997

Accumulators
Adhesive paper
Aluminium foil
AM-FM receivers
Ambulances
Amplifiers
Anaesthetic for childbirth and caesarean section
Angina heart tablets
(Blocked on the grounds that they contain trace amounts of the explosive nitro-glycerine)
Answering machines
Armoured cable
Ashtrays
Auto polish
Axes
Baby food
(Blocked on the grounds that “…it might be consumed by adults…” )
Baby incubators
Bags
Baking soda
Balls (for children, for sport)
Baskets
Bath brushes
Batteries
Battery chargers
Beads
Bearings
Bed lamps
Belts
Benches
Bicycles
Books (all categories included)
Boots
Bottles
Bowls
Boxes
Brass
Broilers
Bulls
(For cattle breeding – blocked on the grounds that accompanying
vaccines “…could be made into weapons of mass destruction…” )
Busses
Calculators
Cameras
Candles
Candlesticks
Canvas (yes, there are also painters in Iraq, didn’t you know ?)
Carpets
Cars
Carts
Carving knives
Cellophane
Chairs
Chalk
Chess boards
Chiffon
Children’s wear
Chisels
Clocks
Chlorine (for water purification)
Cloth (for flour filtering)
Clutches
Coats
Coaxial cable
Cogs
Coils
Colours for painting
Combs
Compressors (for cooling equipment)
Computers and computer supplies
Concrete additives
Copper
Cupboards
Cups
Desks
Desk lamps
Detergents
Dialysis equipment
Dictaphones
Dishware
Dishwashers
Dolls
Doorknobs
Doormats
Drawing knives
Dresses
Drills
Dryers
Dustcloths
Dyes
Dynamos
Easels
EEG monitors
Electric cookers
Electric cords
Envelopes
Epilepsy medication
Eyeglasses
Fabrics
Fans
Fax machines
Fibres
Files
Filing cabinets
Filing cards
Films
Filters
Flashlights
Flowerpots
Forks
Fountain pens
Furniture polish
Fuses
Gas burners
Gauges
Generators
Girdles
Glass
Glue
Gowns
Grills
Grindstone
Hairpins
Hammers
Handkerchiefs
Hats
Headlights
Headphones
Hearing aids
Heart and lung machines
Hedge trimmers
Helmets
Hoes
Hooks
Hook-up wires
Hoses
Hydraulic jacks
Ink (read: The prohibition on writing)
Ink cartridges
Insulator strips
Interruptors
Jackets
Jacks
Joints
Jumpers
Kettles
Knives
Lamp shades
Lathes
Lawn mowers
Leather
Levers
Light bulbs
Light meters
Lime
Magazines (including all scientific and medical journals)
Magnesium
Magnets
Masonite
Mastic
Matches
Medical gauze
Medical swabs
Medical syringes
Measuring equipment
Mica
Microfiche
Microphones
Microscopes
Mirrors
Mops
Motorbikes
Motors
Mufflers
Mugs
Music cassettes
Music CDs
Musical instruments
Musteen cancer drugs
Nail brushes
Nail files
Napkins
Nitrous oxide cylinders (for women in labour)
Notebooks
Oil cans
Oil gauges
Oil lamps
Oscillators
Oxygen tents
Packaging materials
Pails
Painters’ brushes
Paints
Pans
Paper clips
Paper for printing
Paper for wrapping
Paper for writing
(A shipment of paper requested for Iraqi doctors’ exclusive use was once blocked)
Pens
Percolators
Pesticides
Photocopiers
Photometers
Pincers
Pincettes
Pins
Plastics
Plates
Plexiglas
Pliers
Plugs
Plywood
Porcelain
Pots
Potties
Press drills
Pressure cookers
Printing equipment
Pulleys
Putty
PVC sheets for private hospitals
Radiators for cars
Razor blades
Razors
Reels
Relays
Rice
Riveters
Roasters
Rubber
Rugs
Rulers
Sandals
Sandpaper
Sanitary towels
Saucers
Saws
Scales
Scoreboards
Screws
Seals
Seats
Shampoo
Sheers
Shelves
Shirts
Shock absorbers
Shoes
Shoe laces
Shoe polish
Shopping carts
Shovels
Shroud material
(to wrap the bodies of the dead according to Islamic custom)
Silicon
Silver polish
Skirts
Soap
Soap pads
Sockets
Socks
Solder
Soldering irons
Spark plugs
Spatulas
Sponges
Spoons
Stamps
Staplers
Starters
Stethoscopes
Steel plates and joints
Stoves
Straps
Suction catheters
Suits
Sun hats
Surgical gloves
Swimming suits
Switches
Tables
Tacks
Tags
Telephone cables
Telephones
Tents
Thermometers
Threads
Timber
Timers
Tin
Tire pumps
Tissue paper
Toasters
Toilet paper (not considered medicines)
Tongs
Toothbrushes
Toothpaste
Toothpicks
Towels
Toys (read: UN punishment of children)
Tractors
Transformers
Trash cans
Tripods
Troughs
Trousers
Trowels
Trucks
Trunks
TV sets
Typewriters
Umbilical catheters
Vaccines (for Yellow Fever, Diphtheria, and animal diseases)
Vacuum cleaners
Valves
Vans
Vaseline
Vases
Venetian blinds
Ventilators
Videotapes
Voltage regulators
Waffle irons
Wagons
Wallets
Wallpaper
Washing machines
Wastepaper baskets
Watches
Water pumps
Wax
Welders
Wheelbarrows
Wheelchairs
Wheels
Window shades
Wood
Wool
Wrenches
X-ray machine
X-ray film
Zoom lenses

Originele link: www.abacusdx.com/~newdawn/Docs/iraq-sanc10.htm

The list includes mainly consumer products which are now available to the world’s population without any restriction. It must be added that in order to impoverish Iraq and make its population dependent upon foreign imports, raw materials, machines and tools for industry and agriculture are also prohibited by the United Nations, unless the Iraqi government can prove, on a case by case base, that a specific consignment is urgently required for ‘humanitarian’ needs. (These items are blocked by the UN Sanctions Committee on the grounds that they “…constitute an input to Iraqi industry…”. Thus the sanctions policy can be interpreted as specifically designed to prevent Iraq from carrying out any meaningful industrial production and regeneration of its’ economy.)

The UN Sanctions Committee has not issued any comprehensive list of prohibited products, as such a list would include millions of articles. Instead the Sanctions Committee evaluates applications for exporting goods to Iraq on the base of Security Council Resolutions which allow foodstuffs, medicines and products for essential civilian needs. Anything not deemed ‘essential’ by the members of the Sanctions Committee is denied to the Iraqi population.

I urge readers of this list to imagine themselves being denied all the following products for a period of more than 7 years. This should give a small idea of what we are doing to the Iraqis.

If there is any mistake in the list or any important consumer product category missing, please inform me: edavid@itn.is

Post Script

The UN Sanctions Committee has the sole discretion in determining what is essential for every Iraqi. Decisions by the Committee are made behind closed doors. Any one Committee member may veto a permission. Applications for the export of items to Iraq must be made by the potential exporter to the authorities of individual UN member states who then forward the application to the UN Sanctions Committee in New York. The Committee will then assess the qualification of the application, that is whether it is food, medicine or an ‘essential civilian need’, determine that the Iraqi government has also endorsed the transaction, check prices and delivery conditions, and if everything is OK, forward its approval to the authorities of the country where the application came from. The authorities then inform the applicant. Only then is it possible to ship the items. Before being sent, public officials must check that the items concur in quality and quantity to the document approved by the Sanctions Committee. Any discrepancy results in the delaying the shipment.

It must be added that the quantity of food and medicines “allowed” to Iraq is not more than about a third of what was imported to Iraq before the onset of the sanctions. In other words, the United Nations expect Iraqis to live with less than half the food and medicine intake they had at the time when Saddam Hussein ruled without UN intervention.

The lawyers of the Security Council members have studied carefully the requirements of international humanitarian law. By designing into the sanctions regime ‘humanitarian exceptions’ as provided by the ‘oil-for-food’ deal, the members of the Security Council attempt to pre-empt charges of causing the death of hundreds of thousands of Iraqis by starvation and health hazards. By providing the very minimum for physical subsistence to the Iraqi population, lives are not anymore expended by the thousands. This is a step forward away from sheer genocide. The Security Council’s conception of Iraqis is nevertheless that they are not human beings but a herd of 20 million sheep whose minimal needs are reduced to foodstuffs, medicines and some undefined ‘essential civilian needs’ to be determined at a closed committee meetings by well-groomed gentlemen in New York.

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